This is a pasqueflower. Did you know that this is the first spring bloomer on the prairie.

Pasque Flower
Big Bluestem with blue sky
Imagine grass reaching as high as 12 feet.
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Blazing Star in bloom
No, this is not something you'll find in the sky.
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Indian Grass, Photo Credit- Flora of Wisconsin, Aaron Carlson, CC BY-SA
This grass can grow taller than you, measuring 3 to 10 feet tall.
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Round Wild Indigo, Photo Credit: Katja Schulz CC-BY.jpg
Why would a beautiful white flowering prairie plant have a name that is a shade of blue?
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Little bluestem plant
Look for bluestem in the winter with fuzzy white seeds which small birds love to feed on.
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Milkweed plant
Can you guess where the Milkweed plant got its name from?
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Pasqueflower
The first prairie flower to bloom is the pasqueflower.
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Close up of Prairie Coneflower
This delicate yellow coneflower stands between 2 and 5 feet tall.
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Prairie Dock plant
Not to be mistaken for the sunflower or the compass plant.
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Prairie White-Fringed Orchid Close Up, Photo Credit: Joshua Mayer, CC-BY-SA 3.0
Before wet meadows and moist prairies were drained and tilled for agriculture, the prairie white-fringed orchid was more common.
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Purple Coneflower
The purple coneflower is a beautiful summer/fall bloomer.
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Shooting stars
Cranesbill, star shower, diamond-sparks—these are all names for this plant. Can you guess why?
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Sideouts Grama, Photo Credit: Drew Avery, CC-BY
This Wisconsin prairie grass can be found in high prairies in southern Wisconsin to the north.
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Knapweed close-up in field
Spotted knapweed secretes chemicals into the soil that kill surrounding plants.
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Wild Parsnip in field
Warning: Steer Clear of This Invader—wild parsnip juice + ultraviolet light = burned skin
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