Take an online walk with EEK! and view wildflowers of the woods, wetlands and prairies. Then go outside, take a hike, and see if you can spot any of these spring bloomers.

Marsh Marigolds
Blazing Star in bloom
No, this is not something you'll find in the sky.
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Blooming bloodroot
Any guesses how this plant got its name?
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Close up of Dutchman's breeches
What do these flowers look like to you?
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Hepatica
This plant gets its name from the Latin word for liver, hepaticus.
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Round Wild Indigo, Photo Credit: Katja Schulz CC-BY.jpg
Why would a beautiful white flowering prairie plant have a name that is a shade of blue?
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Forest with white trillium in blossom
The trillium gets its name from the Latin word for three.
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March Marigold, Image Credit: Thomas Meyer
Another plant of wet places is the marsh marigold.
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Milkweed plant
Can you guess where the Milkweed plant got its name from?
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Pasqueflower
The first prairie flower to bloom is the pasqueflower.
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Close up of Prairie Coneflower
This delicate yellow coneflower stands between 2 and 5 feet tall.
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Prairie Dock plant
Not to be mistaken for the sunflower or the compass plant.
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Prairie White-Fringed Orchid Close Up, Photo Credit: Joshua Mayer, CC-BY-SA 3.0
Before wet meadows and moist prairies were drained and tilled for agriculture, the prairie white-fringed orchid was more common.
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Purple Coneflower
The purple coneflower is a beautiful summer/fall bloomer.
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Shooting stars
Cranesbill, star shower, diamond-sparks—these are all names for this plant. Can you guess why?
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Wood Anemone growing
You'll find this plant in dry to medium open woods and clearings.
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